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Max Tang

In Vancouver, Canada, Max Tang became the first member of his family to not be born in China. After living in California for three years, the family of immigrants moved one more time to the city of Boston in pursuit of better education and better opportunities. While his older sister began crew and edited the Argo, Max started U10 soccer and tried learning Python. It was only years later did Max realize how fortunate he was to have such freedom and opportunity.

At the age of 14 and in desperate need of something to do over the summer, Max began volunteering at 2Life Communities, a charming and close-knit senior housing community. While assisting in creating a new library database, Max found himself chatting with the amicable residents as they browsed the bookshelves, discussing their latest reads and helping them find new books. Wanting to become more involved with the community, Max started a new IT tutoring program to help senior residents solve their tech issues. He noticed that the residents greatly benefited from the one-on-one, hands-on, learning experience, and helped continue the program even after that summer ended.

This must have kickstarted Max’s interest in public service. In the following year, Max helped promote environmentally-friendly practices at the offices of John Hancock Financial. By hosting “Lunch and Learn” meetings, tabling sessions, and building-wide presentations about the benefits of environmental sustainability, he recognized the power of creativity and cooperation at all levels of the company.

During the school year, Max polishes his leadership and creativity as an officer of his school’s Science Olympiad team, while practicing diplomacy as an officer of the Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship (EPIIC). Bolstered by this and the positive feedback he and his team at John Hancock received, he went on to join the John William Ward Fellowship at Boston Latin School. Now, Max is thankful for having so many opportunities to help the community and is eager to see what he can do with the Ward Fellowship.